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Parole vs. Probation

Parole vs. Probation

Parole vs. Probation

There are many terms out there that most people mix up. Often times, these terms are closely related and describe similar, yet different, things. The terms are often used so closely together that people begin to assume they mean the same thing. A good example of this would the difference between parole and probation.

Just about everyone knows that these two terms have something to do with getting out of jail. However, that is usually the extent of most people’s knowledge on the matter. This is due to the fact that they would rather not spend time learning about terms they will likely never need to know about. Unfortunately for some, jail has a way of sneaking up on them. This makes it important to know the difference between these two terms.

Probation is often a replacement for a jail or prison sentence. A person is given probation by their case judge, and they have set of rules or conditions that they have to follow which vary from case to case. If they fail to follow those, then they will be taken into custody. However, if they follow all of the rules, then they can finish their sentence without ever setting foot in jail or prison.

Parole deals with a person who was recently released from prison. When a person is released from prison, they are not immediately free. They have to go through a sort of trial period, which is what parole is. The person has to prove they are rehabilitated by meeting certain conditions while out on their own. The person is assigned a parole officer that they have to meet with on a regular basis.

It is easy to see that while these two terms are similar, they are also very different. Probation is a way to stay out of jail or prison, while parole is what happens after a person is released from prison. Both, however, do require the person to be on their best behavior, or else they may end up behind bars.

 

Cycling In Los Angeles: Rules Of The Road

Cycling In Los Angeles: Rules Of The Road

Cycling In Los Angeles: Rules Of The Road

Not only does using a bicycle mean decrease the carbon footprint you leave during your daily commute, most people find that riding a bike is often an easier and faster way to commute in Los Angeles. As a cyclist, there are a few rules you should be aware of before you jump on your bike and start pedaling to work.

1. Drivers have to respect your right to be on the road

You have just as much right to bike to work as motorist have to drive to work. According to the AB-1371-California Statutes, which was passed into law n September 2013, drivers are required to maintain a safe distance between their car and a bicyclist when they pass the person on a bicycle. The distance must be a minimum of 3 feet between the bike and the car. The one exception to this is if the car driver slows down and take extra precautions to make sure not to hit the biker.

2. You must follow the flow of traffic

Bicyclists are not allowed to ride against the flow of traffic. While going against the flow of traffic might be the fastest way for you to get to your destination, it also increases the risk of you getting seriously hurt in a car/bike accident.

In addition to being required to go with the flow of the traffic, cyclists are also required to stick to the right side of the road. There are exceptions to this rule such as making a left turn, riding on a narrow road or a one-way street, or if the road is under construction.

3. Car drivers are responsible for car doors

One of the most common accidents between drivers and cyclists is accidents involving car doors. LA lawmakers passed Cal. Vehicle Code 22517, which requires the driver and other occupants in the car to look and confirm that there aren’t any cyclist close by before they open the doors. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t look where you’re going, if you’re far back when the car door opens and you crash into it because you weren’t paying attention, you’ll be the one the police consider responsible for the accident.

4. Don’t drink and cycle

Don’t assume that just because you’re riding a bike rather than driving a vehicle, that you don’t have to worry about how much you drink when you’re out on the town. You do. Cal. Vehicle Code 23152 states that when used for commuting, a bicycle is a vehicle, which means that if an LAPD officer pulls you over, they can arrest you and charge you with a DUI.

When you and the drivers in Los Angeles watch out for one another and obey the traffic laws, you’ll find that there’s plenty of room on the streets for everyone.

Think Twice Before Throwing That Frisbee

Think Twice Before Throwing That Frisbee

Think Twice Before Throwing That Frisbee

If you’re in Los Angeles County, you might want to reconsider playing frisbee with your best friend or dog. The county has a law that clearly states that before you can throw a frisbee, permission needs to be granted by a lifeguard.

Yep, this sounds like one of those ridiculous laws that are just plain silly. After all, if you’re in your own yard or a public park, it’s unlikely that you’ll even be able to track down a lifeguard. And even when you’re on the beach, no one seeks a lifeguard out just to ask if they can throw a frisbee back and forth. Yet, it does exist, and when you dig just a little deeper, you’ll start to realize that there’s actually a pretty sound basis for the law.

Basically, what the law means is that if you’re on a public beach and your playing with a frisbee (or anything else) and the lifeguard feels that you’re being a nuisance or disruptive, they can ask you to quit. The reason for the law is that there are times when throwing frisbees, balls, boomerangs, etc. can not only prove disruptive to others who are trying to enjoy the same space.

If a lifeguard (or police officer, park official, etc.) requests that you stop throwing the frisbee and you fail to do so, the Los Angeles courts have the right to hit you with a $1,000 fine for failure to comply to the request. Failing to pay the fine can result in your arrest and criminal charges.

One of the biggest mistakes that people make when a lifeguard or park official comes up to them and requests that they stop doing something, such as tossing a frisbee around, is taking the request personally and losing their temper, which in turn means the official gets upset. Tensions mount until the official has no choice but to take drastic action that could result in your arrest. The best way to handle the situation is to remain polite and listen to what the official has to say. More often than not, they’ll provide an explanation for their request as well as a suggestion about another location or time when you can resume your frisbee throwing. If the request seems outrageous to you, rather than getting upset with the official, ask to see their supervisor.

Keeping a cool head and knowing when it’s best to take your frisbee and walk away from the entire situation, you’ll avoid a hefty fine and won’t risk spending a night in jail.

Are Drones Legal During Emergency Situations

Are Drones Legal During Emergency Situations

Are Drones Legal During Emergency Situations

Over the past few years, the general population has become obsessed with drones. One of the best things about drones is the ability to use them to take pictures of things that simply aren’t possible to get through more conventional methods. Most of the time, they’re harmless, but Los Angeles law officials are concerned about the small drones flying around during emergency situations.

The Problem

The issue of drones and what to do about them in the middle of a crisis was first brought up during the Lilac fire in San Diego. The fire was brutal, by the time fire fighters stopped the blaze, more than 150 buildings had been damaged and thousands of people had been forced to flee the city. It was a spectacular and heartbreaking crisis that proved too much for one drone owner to resist. They sent their small drone up into the sky, above the fire, presumably to capture some pictures of the blaze.

When they did so, it’s likely that the drone owner thought they were okay. It didn’t occur to them that as a result of their actions, emergency crews would be forced to suspend their attempts to suppress the blaze for a full hour as they tried to decide what to do about the drone. The concern was that if they sent their own firefighting drones up into the air, they would collide with the private drone, creating an expensive accident.

Drone Killers To The Rescue

Based on this one event, one police department decided that they needed to be prepared to encounter drones during future emergency situations, which is why the purchased an electronic tool that has been dubbed, the Drone Killer. The Drone Killers only function is to disable any drone that might be flying around during and emergency, sending it crashing to the ground. The Drone Killer currently has the ability to disable more than one hundred different types of popular drones.

Could Legal Action Be Around The Corner

As soon as society became obsessed with drones, law makers started exploring legal options connected the un-manned aircraft. Interfering with emergency air craft has always been a concern. It’s likely that using the drone killer is just the first step in dealing with drones during emergency situations. It’s reasonable to assume that it won’t be long before law makers start arresting people who fly their drones over fires, traffic accidents, and near hospitals.